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Divorce


Alimony: Temporary Support
Temporary alimony is the same as temporary spousal support, and both provide sustenance to the dependent party through the course of a divorce case. During the proceedings, the dependent spouse and the parties' children may require financial support, and courts may grant temporary support for that purpose. Dependant spouses can seek temporary support during legal separation as well.

Fault-based Divorce: Adultery
There can be various grounds for seeking a divorce; adultery is stated as a reason for divorce in the laws of the majority of states that allow fault-based divorces. Adultery is defined as voluntary, consensual sexual intercourse or sexual activity by a married person with someone other than their legal spouse. While intercourse is usually required, something less may amount to adultery under the divorce laws in some states.

Modification of Orders Affecting Use of Marital Home
One issue that arises in divorce proceedings is the use and possession of the family home, particularly when the spouses are living in the same house and both require use and possession of the home. If the parties have minor children, the custodial parent usually receives the right to use and possess the home in order to safeguard the children's interest. This right is given to the custodial parent as a form of maintenance or support, in the court's discretion. The right given to one of the spouses is limited to a specific period after the divorce, which is determined by the court. That benefit may last in some form until the parties' youngest child no longer is a minor.

Property Division in Divorce: Treatment of Workers’ Compensation Benefits
In common law equitable distribution states, the general presumption is that workers' compensation is treated as marital property if acquired during the marriage. In pure community property jurisdictions, it is treated as community property if acquired during marriage and as separate property if it is acquired before marriage or after marriage dissolution.

Spouses as Witnesses in Divorce Proceedings
In general, either spouse can testify in a ''no fault'' divorce proceeding, in a fault-based divorce proceeding, in a property settlement hearing, or in proceedings relating to custody determinations. While such testimony can be highly relevant in a divorce proceeding, there are some rules (including the marital communications and anti-marital facts privileges) that come into play when considering the admissibility of such testimony.



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